Shifting the Public Focus Back to Productivity

On Friday, October 11th, there was a commemorative naming ceremony to rename the Pavilion in Centennial Park to the “Ian McDonald Pavilion.” Ian was a long-time Manotick resident and known to many in the community.  Thank you to David Wildman for submitting this commemorative naming application to the City!

On Friday, October 11th, there was a commemorative naming ceremony to rename the Pavilion in Centennial Park to the “Ian McDonald Pavilion.” Ian was a long-time Manotick resident and known to many in the community. Thank you to David Wildman for submitting this commemorative naming application to the City!

In recent weeks, things have been fairly tumultuous at City Council. This certainly is not the term that I envisioned. Some have compared this to the 2006-2010 Term of Council, but it is clear now that this one is different. I recently wrote about the current term in one of my columns. Instead of focusing on the negative, though, I would like to take some time to shed light on some of the things I am involved in as your Councillor since most of the public focus is on what is happening at Council rather than what we are doing at Council. One of the main reasons for doing this now is that I was recently named as one of two Councillors who will be responsible for duties in College Ward. I would like to ensure all residents of Rideau-Goulbourn that this will not take away from our team’s efforts to look after our constituents, first and foremost.

Council has several Sponsors Groups currently. These are made of Councillors with the intent to guide discussion and policy outside of the Committee structure. It helps ensure that Council’s voice is heard throughout the various processes in developing new and significant policy. If I remember correctly, there are currently four Council Sponsors Groups. I sit on three of them. All relate to my role as Chair of the Standing Committee on Environmental Protection, Water & Waste Management.

The first is the sponsors group assisting with the development of the City of Ottawa’s new Solid Waste Master Plan. This is our opportunity to determine which direction we are taking on all aspects of garbage. Our key priorities need to be waste diversion and reduction. How do we make it easier for our residents, not more difficult? I am of the belief that it is not your fault that you end up with waste at the end of the week that can only go in a garbage bag. You should not be seen as being in the wrong and you should not be punished for this. Other municipalities have gone down the road of punitive measures as a means to increase waste diversion. I do not support that. Further, the last thing we want is another landfill. The second last thing I want is an incinerator with an exorbitant price tag. Consider that the relatively new incinerator in Durham will cost taxpayers $600M by 2029. What other options exist? We are already working on developing answers to that question and we need to be open to innovative alternatives. Other members of this group are Councillors El-Chantiry, Dudas and Menard.

The next sponsors group is on the matter of climate change. This one is not necessarily attached to any one policy direction, but we are currently overseeing the Climate Change Master Plan and the implementation of Energy Evolution, which is Ottawa’s collaborative effort with the community to transition to renewable energy. As an example, Energy Evolution includes a project with the Burritt’s Rapids Renewable Energy Association to bring hydroelectricity to the community using the Rideau River. Our efforts here remain focused on making our City for environmentally sound as well as finding financial efficiencies in our operations. Making City buildings more efficient will save taxpayers dollars in the long run. It is a win-win and that is where my focus is. Other Councillors on this group include Councillors’ Fleury, Menard, Kavanagh, Sudds and Dudas.

Finally, we have the Official Plan review sponsors group. While I was originally on this as Chair of the Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee, I have found my way back on it chairing a different committee. Funny how that works out sometimes. Joining Councillors Blais, El-Chantiry, Gower, Tierney and Harder, our focus here is guiding the development of a new Official Plan for the City of Ottawa that projects out to 2046. Being Environment Chair allows me to cast a wide lens on policy development. The reality is that urban sprawl impacts rural areas in more ways than one. As a rural Councillor, my prime objective will always be protecting agricultural lands. There is an environmental benefit to that as well as helping to protect rural village identities. We are a city of one million residents and growing. Intensification in the urban area as well as in villages is an important tool but it is all easier said than done. While many support the concept of intensification, the story becomes quite different when that intensification occurs in your neighbourhood. How do we plan for the future, recognize the growth that is coming all the while manage our communities through smart growth? That is what is facing us in this Official Plan review. This review will continue right through 2020 and I hope our communities will be engaged in that process. Don’t wait for a development application to get involved. By then, it is usually too late.

In addition to these, I also have my regular responsibilities on various committees and boards. Therefore, it is so important to have a great team around me and I am very fortunate for having exactly that.

 Community Dancing in Manotick

Interested in a fun, interactive session of dance, laughter & music? Join the Ever Hopeful Stringband and caller Pippa Hall for a family-friendly, alcohol-free evening of community dancing, including circles, squares and contras. Each dance is taught and the whole family is invited. The evening begins with simple dances, followed by dances that build on skills as the evening progresses. The fun takes place Friday, October 25th, from 7:00pm to 9:30pm, at the Manotick United Church.  Admission is $10, $5 for those aged 12-18 and free for anyone under the age of 12. The family max admission is $20. For more information, please call 613-692-4576 or visit http://dance.manotick.net.

If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca

1966 Roger Stevens Drive, 2020 Civic Events Funding Program & Cleaning the Capital

In recent columns, I have mentioned a community information meeting to discuss Broccolini's Official Plan and Zoning By-law amendments for 1966 Roger Stevens Drive. Unfortunately, we needed to reschedule that meeting to give the City and the applicant more time to prepare. The rescheduled community information meeting date has now been set for Thursday, October 17th from 7:00 to 9:00pm at the Alfred Taylor Recreation Center in North Gower. City planning staff and the applicant, Broccolini, will join me at this meeting.  

The subject application involves the property on the southwest corner of Roger Stevens Drive and Highway 416. This site had previously been designated for industrial and highway commercial uses. Through that application, parameters were set on building heights, land use and so on. Included in that approved plan were also several residential lots along Third Line Road. The application before us now seeks to alter two specific elements.

The most straightforward request is the desire of the applicant to increase the permitted height on the property from 15m to 30m. To give you some sense of that height on this property, the existing silo sits on the top of the hill at just under 20m. The proposed development would see a levelling of that area meaning the proposed height is approximately the height of the silo today.

The other request is to make the property one zone. As it stands now, the site is split into three zones. Over 90% of the property is zoned for industrial and commercial uses. Both permit the building of a warehouse. A small portion right in the middle of the property does not permit warehouse as a use. As a result, the applicant wishes to alter that to permit a warehouse on the entire property.

At the community information meeting, the applicant will focus on the differences between the current zoning and what their request is. Briefly, a large scale industrial warehouse development is already a permitted use. The big change here is one taller building rather than many smaller buildings. Both would have an impact on transportation, nearby properties and the environment. Regardless of what is built here, these are concerns that residents have and the meeting will be an opportunity to discuss those concerns and understand how they can be or are being addressed.

If you have any comments or questions about this application, please feel free to contact myself or the Planner, Jeff Ostafichuk at Jeffrey.Ostafichuk@ottawa.ca.

2020 Civic Events Funding Program

The application process for the 2020 Civic Events Funding Program is now open. The City of Ottawa invites local not-for-profit organizations, such as community groups and recreation associations to apply for up to $3,000 in funding to deliver community events that take place in local, geographic communities and neighbourhoods in the City of Ottawa. These family-friendly events must include family entertainment and activities that appeal to members of the geographic community where the event is being held.

Please review the information package carefully for additional eligibility criteria.

https://ottawa.ca/en/residents/recreation-and-parks/recreation-and-parks-funding

Information Package and Application Forms are available at ottawa.ca or at any Ottawa Client Service Centre. The program deadline is Wednesday, October 9th at 4:00pm. If you are unsure of your eligibility or have questions, please contact the Funding, Partnerships & Agreements Unit to discuss eligibility criteria and the application process at rec-info@ottawa.ca or by phone at 613-580-2424 ext. 14133.

Cleaning the Capital

The City of Ottawa is pleased to announce the annual Cleaning the Capital fall campaign, which will take place from September 15th to October 15th. Early-bird registration began August 15th.

Registration is quick and easy:

  • Go to www.ottawa.ca/clean, or call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401) to register for the cleanup. The interactive map on our website will show you which locations have already been claimed, allow you to register your own project site and choose the cleanup supplies that you need.

  • Select a location such as a park, ravine, shoreline, bus stop, pathway or any public area that requires litter pickup, graffiti removal or cleanup.

This is a great opportunity for families and friends to work together on community cleanup projects that help make Ottawa clean, green, graffiti-free and litter-free. Cleaning the Capital is also an excellent way for high school students to earn their community volunteer hours.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Richmond Fair, City of Ottawa Official Plan & Mud Creek Open House

Fallowfield Village had a very successful corn roast at the start of September. Over 200 residents enjoyed Jojo's Creameria truck, a busker (Jean-Guy Beaudry), and an awesome firework display by Gerry Moore. Congrats to the community for hosting such a successful event!   Photo credit: Mike Giovinazzo (submitted by Martin Clarke, President of the Fallowfield Village Association)

Fallowfield Village had a very successful corn roast at the start of September. Over 200 residents enjoyed Jojo's Creameria truck, a busker (Jean-Guy Beaudry), and an awesome firework display by Gerry Moore. Congrats to the community for hosting such a successful event!

Photo credit: Mike Giovinazzo (submitted by Martin Clarke, President of the Fallowfield Village Association)

This weekend marks the 175th year for the Richmond Fair. To be precise, this year’s edition will be held from September 19th to the 22nd. Beginning in 1844, the Fair has grown to epitomize the village of Richmond. It is as much a part of Richmond as the village is to the Fair. The two are synonymous with one another. Over the years, it has been a big part of my life as well.

During my years at South Carleton, I was one of those Friday night youths who took over the fairgrounds. I never got kicked out of the fair during those years, though, so I have that going for me. In the years since, the Fair has become a significant part of my professional life as well. In 2006, I hosted my first booth at the Fair for the municipal election that year. While only a few years removed from high school at the time, it was a fun opportunity to reconnect with friends and meet new people. I owe a lot of my success in 2006 to the opportunity afforded to me at the Fair. The presence of my grandmother, Hilda Moore, didn’t hurt either. As past President of the Richmond Legion and a longtime volunteer with many local Goulbourn organizations, my grandmother was a mainstay at the Fair.

I have had the pleasure of hosting a booth at the front gate of the Fair ten different years. During each of those years, I would spend between 30 and 40 hours on the fairgrounds. It is something I look forward to every year and something my family looks forward to as well. The Richmond Fair is more than just an opportunity to be present as the Councillor for Rideau-Goulbourn but a chance for my children to enjoy what so many have for decades before them. My kids have grown up at the Richmond Fair. They have produced countless memories over the years for which I am forever grateful.

175 years is an incredible achievement. Last year, Richmond celebrated its bicentennial. That celebration came together thanks to the countless volunteers in the village. The Richmond Fair is no different. Volunteers are what make communities great and the Richmond Fair runs on volunteerism. From the concerts inside the arena to the homecraft exhibits to the horse shows, everything is put together each and every year by countless volunteers and we owe them a debt of gratitude.

I am certain it will not be long until we are celebrating the bicentennial of the Richmond Fair but don’t wait 25 years to go and enjoy the Fair, whether it is the first time you go or the 60th. Every year at the Fair is special and the Richmond Agricultural Society is doing their best to make the 175th every bit as special as the previous 174.

For more information about the Richmond Fair, please visit www.richmondfair.ca and I hope to see you around the fairgrounds.

City of Ottawa Official Plan

As we celebrate our past, staff and Councillors at the City are busy planning our future and we want to know what you think about how Ottawa will change and grow around us, now and for years to come. We are in the midst of rewriting Ottawa’s Official Plan – the strategic document that describes how the city will grow over time, where we will place major infrastructure, and what policies will be in place to support economic growth and guide the development and evolution of communities. Our goal is to position Ottawa to be flexible, resilient and, above all, a city where people want to live, work and play.

Following initial consultations with the public and stakeholders on a series of wide-ranging discussion papers, we are proposing to make a number of significant policy changes, known as the Five Big Moves: Growth, Mobility, Urban Design, Resiliency, and Economy.

We want to know what you think about these changes and how they will affect your daily lives. Learn more and share your thoughts about the Five Big Moves at ottawa.ca/NewOP from now until September 16th.

Your feedback will help us develop a set of comprehensive policy directions that City Council will consider in late 2019. Should Council support these directions, the City will develop a draft Official Plan to present to Council by summer 2020.

Mud Creek Open House

The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority will host an open house to discuss new hazard mapping for Mud Creek in Manotick on Tuesday, September 24th from 4:30pm to 8:00pm at their headquarters (3889 Rideau Valley Drive). Learn about the mapping study and have your say. For more details, visit: https://www.rvca.ca/media-releases/open-house-mud-creek-hazard-mapping-study.  

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

LRT Stage 2

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In my most recent column two weeks ago, I spoke of the current climate at City Hall. If you have not had a chance to read that one, I encourage you to do so because it will help you understand some of the dynamics surrounding the LRT Stage 2 debate in recent months. This column is entirely dedicated to the Stage 2 contract, which was awarded earlier this year to TransitNEXT, a wholly owned subsidiary of SNC-Lavalin. The timeline for this contract happens to span the last three terms of Council, including the present one.

 On December 19, 2012, Council approved the Design, Build, Finance & Maintenance of Ottawa’s Light Rail Project, otherwise known as Stage 1. The procurement model for Stage 2 was adapted from Stage 1. On March 8, 2017, Council approved a report on “Stage 2 LRT Implementation” which included the procurement model for both the Confederation Line extensions and the Trillium Line extension. The Trillium Line is the extension of the existing north-south O-Train line. The Confederation Line is the east-west line. The Trillium Line extension has been the contentious one and that is what I will focus on.

The debate at Council in March 2017 centred mainly on the acquisition of property and the extensions themselves. Members of Council did not discuss the procurement model. While motions were tabled at the Council meeting, no motions were brought forward that would have altered the procurement model and the delegated authority to staff. In short, Council unanimously approved the process that eventually selected TransitNEXT as the builder for the Trillium Line extension as is. This is important considering the entire debate recently has been about the procurement model.

The procurement process took over two years. The first step was a Request for Qualifications (RFQ). The RFQ resulted in three groups that were shortlisted to bid on the Trillium Line. In order to make it through the RFQ, the bidders had to show the technical expertise required to carry out the project. Only successful bidders carried through to the Request for Proposals (RFP) phase. TransitNEXT was one of them. As a result, the technical merits of the bidders were not a concern at that time.

When the RFP award came to Council in March of this year, the procurement process was still open. That means there were key elements that had to remain confidential. Releasing that information could have jeopardized the Council approved procurement process. It was not until recently that the procurement process closed and the scores could be released. The main point here is that the other two bidders have now signed off on the procurement process thus removing any potential liabilities, in terms of lawsuits. Members of Council knew this in March. Therefore, when some members of Council were seemingly surprised they could not learn the scores, they knew why. This is where the theatre of politics rears its ugly head.

If you recall that March 2019 meeting of Council, you will recall the doubt that was planted regarding TransitNEXT’s ability to perform. Several Councillors kept asking similar questions repeatedly about the procurement process and the scoring. Staff could not answer for the reasons mentioned above. Of course, Council knew this. After all, we approved the procurement process unanimously two years earlier. New Councillors elected in 2018 get a bit of a pass but those Councillors who voted in favour of the procurement process in 2017 should have had a decent idea of what they were approving. Therefore, their surprised behavior at Council was merely a show. If it was not a show, they clearly did not read the 2017 reports to Council. I am not sure which one is more worrying. I am more of the opinion that it was for show, meaning they were misleading the public to believe staff were refusing to answer questions.

Let’s now discuss the scoring. The scoring is broken into two components; the financial submission and the technical submission. The financial component is out of 500 while the technical component is broken down to four categories: General Technical Requirements, Design Submission, Construction Submission, and Maintenance & Rehabilitation. Each of the technical categories are graded with a threshold of 70%. This is where the controversy comes in. We do not need to focus too much on the financial submissions as the TransitNEXT bid won that aspect with a score of 485 over the other bidders at 212 and 93. We can, therefore, simply focus on the technical scores.

The SNC Lavalin led TransitNEXT bid exceeded the 70% threshold on the General Technical Requirements and the Construction Submission. They fell below the threshold on the other two criteria. Overall, their evaluation ended up at 67.27%. At the time the scoring was known to the bid evaluation team, they had an opportunity to reach out to SNC to clarify the scoring and to have them address some concerns, which led to the lower score, just below the threshold. Since the scoring is subjective, the evaluation team does have flexibility. Given the weight of the scoring and the proximity to the threshold, the evaluation team felt they had the confidence to carry forward with the TransitNEXT bid. Their ability to do this was contained in the procurement process. In the end, the overall scoring had TransitNEXT at 821.35, well ahead of the other two bidders at 641.22 and 517.94. The process was followed and overseen by external lawyers as well as a Fairness Commissioner.

The scores are now known and the explanation surrounding the procurement process is known as well. Would it change my vote in March 2019? It would not. As mentioned, we knew the procurement process and we approved it unanimously in 2017. We have a procurement model in place that removes politicians from the evaluation process. The reason for that is to avoid political interference and potential corruption. Imagine if a member of Council pushes to have the bid from TransitNEXT rejected because of SNC Lavalin’s involvement and yet they received a campaign donation from one of the other bid teams. It is not impossible considering the local contractors on the other two bids. Avoiding the appearance of corruption is a wise choice. Delegating authority for procurement matters achieves that. The process was not flawed. Some people just did not like the outcome. Why?

It is my belief that this entire issue comes down to one thing and one thing only: SNC Lavalin. If this were any other company involved, we would not have this controversy. Due to the issues on Parliament Hill with SNC Lavalin and the upcoming Federal Election, there is a lot of negative attention surrounding SNC Lavalin. We simply cannot deny a contract based on what is happening on Parliament Hill. The reality is that City Hall is not the PMO. There is no Jody Wilson-Raybould at City Hall. There is no Gerald Butts. This standard procurement process yielded the best result for progress and for taxpayers. I have full confidence in that process and in the outcome. Everything else is just a convenient distraction for those politicians wishing to create one.

All of the reports mentioned in this column are available if you wish to read them. The procurement documents are also now available for public consumption. The Stage 1 contract is also a public document and the Stage 2 contract will be as well. If you wish to see any of these, please do not hesitate to contact me.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

City Council of 2018 to 2022

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In recent columns, I have focused on some of our recent decisions at City Hall and, in some instances, the controversy behind them. In two weeks, I will delve into the LRT Stage 2 contract. In that case, all of the focus is on the extension of the existing O-Train line into Riverside South and not the overall LRT east-west project. As background before I do that, though, I think it is important to spend a bit of time discussing Council themselves. This is not the same Council from the previous eight years and it is not even a Council similar to that during the Larry O’Brien years. This one is different and it is influencing much of the discussion that has been occurring outside of City Hall and on some of our biggest files.

For those of you who may not remember, one of my key commitments when I ran for Council in 2010 was teamwork and cooperation at City Hall. To be clear, that does not just mean we should agree on everything and ignore debate. What it means to me is that we work together. This is not Provincial or Federal politics. There is no “Official Opposition”. We are all in power and we all have the ability to contribute, if we choose to do so. When I look at examples of cooperation and collaboration, I think of where we ended up on the Rideau-Carleton Raceway file. On Stonebridge, I work with Jan Harder. On the climate emergency, I worked with Shawn Menard. On plastics, I worked with Catherine McKenney. On rural internet access, I worked with Jeff Leiper. On an initiative in Blackburn Hamlet, I worked with Jody Mitic and now Laura Dudas. When I hold budget consultations, I do so with George Darouze. This is how we get things done. We do not draw lines and pick sides. We work together, regardless of the issue and whom you are working with because we all represent the same people: the citizens of Ottawa.

When we look at the last few months, and the issues I have been highlighting of late, that commitment to cooperation is clearly not shared by all. Not every member of Council arrives at City Hall with the same motivations. Not every member of Council maintains the same beliefs throughout their time on Council. Factions form and divisions rise. One thing I remember Tobi Nussbaum saying to me early in the 2014-18 term of Council is that he was impressed at how we can all disagree on an item but then just move on and work together on the next item. Again, this is not that Council. How did we get here?

During every election, there is an overarching sentiment. In 2010, it was the previous Council’s dysfunction. In 2018, it was the apparent lack of debate. As a reversal of why I was elected in 2010, some campaigned in 2018 on a notion of disruption. I would call this debate for the sake of debate. Instead of reports coming through Committee for proper consultation, debate and discussion, those items are coming directly to Council. There is no opportunity for community input through the Committee structure so it turns into a free for all at Council. Some members have decided there are two distinct sides and they stick to it. That reality adds toxicity to our debates. One new member of Council was recently quoted as saying they are happy they are not on the Mayor’s “side.” Consider that the Mayor received more votes in their ward than they did. How does that desire to be an opponent make you representative of your constituents? Are we elected to represent or are we elected to pick sides? You may have different answers but mine have always been the same. We are here to represent regardless of who else is elected.

The only real result of this entire situation is that every member of Council looks bad. There are times when what happens at Council is somewhat scripted. I will not pretend one side is worse than the other is. The current climate can only be fixed by a desire to move forward and work together. On issues like the Chateau Laurier and LRT Stage 2, some Councillors have knowingly stated misleading information. I will explain that in more detail when I get into the contract situation of Stage 2 LRT.

At the end of this term of Council, those of us elected in 2010 will have been here for twelve years. That includes the Mayor. What you are seeing at Council right now is more about 2022 than it is about anything. People are jockeying for position. They are looking to the Mayoralty in 2022. They are looking to win. Unfortunately, the result is that their constituents lose. We are not elected just to get re-elected. We are not elected to simply govern in four year increments. We are not elected to put ourselves above our jobs. We are elected to represent. We are elected to see beyond four year terms. We are elected to lead, not mislead. Thankfully, we still have time to make this term more effective. We just need to have enough members of Council, the Mayor included, willing to make the effort. I know I am.

1966 Roger Stevens Drive

Broccolini has submitted an official plan amendment and zoning by-law amendment for 1966 Roger Stevens Drive. The application can be reviewed on City’s Development Application Search Tool where you will find information about the application and all of the submitted plans, reports, surveys and accompanying documents you will need to review the application. You can find this at Ottawa.ca/devapps.

This is the property on the southwest corner of Highway 416 and Roger Stevens Drive. It was previously designated for industrial and commercial uses. This application is to alter the plan from multiple buildings totaling 1.4M square feet to instead build one building totaling 700,000 square feet. The proposal involves road modifications to Roger Stevens Drive including signalization and new turning lanes at the off and on ramps. The plan also includes the retention of the trees on the west side of the property forming a buffer between the building and the homes along Third Line Road that were created as part of this property’s original application approximately twenty years ago.

At this point, the tenant is not confirmed. Broccolini has built distribution centres previously for Amazon, Target, Canadian Tire, Sobey’s and IKEA, among others. As they get further in the process, they will likely be in a position to secure a tenant and disclose that. There will be a public meeting about this application and I will be sure to provide notification when it is scheduled.

Comments can be sent to Jeffrey Ostafichuk, Planner, at: Jeffrey.Ostafichuk@ottawa.ca or (613) 580-2424 X31329

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Waste Management, Bottled Water in City Facilities & Climate Emergency Declaration

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My first two terms in office have been somewhat polar opposites when it comes to waste management. From 2010-2014, the City moved to bi-weekly garbage collection, expanded what was accepted in the blue box, introduced the green bins in schools program, expanded the availability and collection of the green bin and extended the life of the landfill as a result. On the Plasco front, we unfortunately saw the failure of that project, culminating with its official demise in December 2014. During the 2014-18 term of Council, all was quiet on the garbage front. The only change of any significance was the settlement of the Orgaworld arbitration and the subsequent addition of plastic bags to the green bin.

During this term of Council, we will be discussing everything there is to discuss when it comes to waste management. Last month, we approved the roadmap for our Solid Waste Master Plan review. This will be a two-year review and the plan is to cover all aspects of waste from how you acquire it and how the City collects it to how we can divert more and how we process the rest. The last thing I want to look at is a new landfill.

When it comes to the existing landfill; that is something that works to our advantage. The current lifespan is set at 2042. I have absolutely zero interest in scouting locations for a new one. That means we need to consider stronger waste diversion. We also need to consider alternatives to the landfill. Where do we go with the green bin program when the contract ends in 2030? Is there a viable waste-to-energy solution that does not cost the City $300M and double your garbage collection fee? Can we make it easier for residents to recycle and can we reduce the amount of waste you actually end up with? These are just some of the questions we want to answer in the next two years.

I am very much looking forward to this review. We will have a comprehensive public consultation component and I hope you will get involved. There are few issues which elicit more opinions than garbage collection. I hope we can channel that interest and come up with a way forward that will help serve the City and its residents for the next 30-50 years.

Bottled Water in City Facilities

Another matter discussed at the Environment Committee last month was the idea of banning the sale of bottled water in City-owned facilities. This issue is almost less about plastic bottles and more about the quality of the water that the City produces. It is routinely the best rated water in the country.

At the moment, the City has a sponsorship agreement with Coca-Cola to sell beverages in City facilities. Of course, this includes bottled water. To end the contract would cost upwards of $700,000. We will not be doing that. However, Council approved a motion that will have staff look at the next contract and how that could be arranged to limit the amount of single use plastics and promote City water.

There is much to consider when doing this. Some believe you can simply ban all plastics and your problems are solved. That simply is not true. There are accessibility realities that we must consider. This is why we did not implement a ban immediately. We must consider all aspects of this and bring forward a plan that improves the situation without creating new problems.

Climate Emergency Declaration

Like with many issues recently, this was another issue that came through the Committee that I Chair that had some significant misinformation surrounding it. I have never been too interested in posturing, pandering and grandstanding. When votes of that nature come forward, I do not support them. With that in mind, it was important to ensure that any discussion about a “climate emergency” was not solely for political gain or to give the appearance of something. As I said, I could never support such a baseless declaration.

My focus remains on what is best for the City and what is best for the residents of it. I bring that mentality to my every day job as Councillor and I certainly bring it to my role as Chair of the Environment Committee. I am not interesting in playing political games and I cannot worry about the motives of my colleagues. What I can do is ensure that anything that comes through Environment Committee is meaningful and keeps all residents in mind.

One of the biggest challenges for our Committee in recent years has been direction. We have had many items on the go but no clear path forward. I alluded to this earlier on the waste management file over the last four years. We are trying to change that this term. I believe the climate emergency motion from Councillor Shawn Menard can help in that regard. The recommendations contained within the report focus on the Air Quality & Climate Change Master Plan as well as Energy Evolution. These are previously identified priorities for the City of Ottawa. It also recommends a Council Sponsors Group and a climate resiliency plan, something staff have already committed to.

As Chair of the Environment Committee, I will have direct oversight for how any of the recommendations move forward and I will be taking a leadership role on all matters that fall under the jurisdiction of that Committee. This initiative does not take funds from general revenues. As approved by Council, we will start with $500,000 from the Hydro Ottawa surplus, which comes from return on investments. This is above and beyond the $20M surplus the City receives annually.

The initiatives that comes from this will be implemented with BOTH the environment and the taxpayer in mind. We have many examples of projects that reduced the long term operating costs of the City of Ottawa all the while being better for the environment. Gone are the days where being green meant spending more money. Today, we are focused on energy efficiency and waste diversion and other environmental initiatives that will save money rather than require larger budgets.

At the end of the day, I am elected to be considerate of how we spend your money. We also have a responsibility to be efficient environmentally as well as economically. I believe the two are not mutually exclusive and that is why I support the climate emergency motion. For me, it was not about the declaration. It was about the substance of the motion and the ability to focus on projects that are smart for the City and for the residents who live here.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Chateau Laurier Update

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In September 2016, the owners of the Chateau Laurier, Larco Investments, unveiled an expansion plan for the historic hotel. The parking garage addition at the rear of the property was crumbling and their proposal was to replace it with a 12-storey addition featuring 200 new hotel rooms. This proposal was heavily criticized and the architect revised the plan and came back in November of the same year. The new design was 8% smaller but still significantly controversial. They tried to improve the sightlines but the proposed expansion still towered behind the existing hotel.

A year later, Larco returned to the community with a third design. This one was likened to a glass box using none of the architectural features of the Chateau Laurier although it was shorter and preserved the roofline of the existing hotel. May 2018 brought a fourth design and that is where we need to begin to understand how we got to where we are today.

When the fourth design came to Built Heritage Sub-Committee in June 2018, a committee that I have been a member of since 2012, we sought to create a compromise that would resolve the design issues. We also, admittedly, had the intention to allow Larco to move forward with what was felt to be a much-needed expansion with additional rooms in the downtown core, not to mention the reinstatement of their missing parking garage. In addition to all of the normal heritage guidelines and policies Larco needed to meet, we added three conditions of approval. They were all aimed to have the addition, which at this time was a box, to take more elements from the Chateau Laurier, including an increase in Indiana Limestone and the copper that is synonymous with the roof. This compromise motion was drafted by Councillors Tobi Nussbaum and Mathieu Fleury as well as Committee Vice Chair Barry Padolsky. Council then passed it unanimously. Admittedly, this is something that I helped achieve.

To summarize, we entered 2019 knowing we had approved a bar shaped building in the spirit of the buildings that surrounded Major’s Hill Park, namely the American Embassy, the Connaught Building and the National Art Gallery. What we expected was a more sympathetic design using more of the materials from the original hotel. Of note, however, is that no matter what design was before us, the interaction between the building and the park was actually an improvement to the solid wall that was the former parking garage.

The final design was unveiled in May of this year. According to the applicant, and confirmed by our Heritage Planners, Larco met all of the necessary criteria and the conditions imposed by Council a year earlier. The new design was lowered to seven storeys and the room count dropped to 147. More limestone was added and vertical bronze elements were added to the roofline on the west and east portions of the expansion. Nevertheless, Built Heritage Sub-Committee felt the conditions were not met but no longer had jurisdiction to render a decision due to the approval of their heritage permit in 2018.

Staying on the subject of design, I just want to be clear that an exact replica was and never will be an option for the Chateau Laurier. I have heard some people suggest this. An exact replica actually goes against most heritage guidelines and it certainly goes against Parks Canada’s heritage building guidelines. The only designs Council can deal with are the ones that are presented to us. We cannot dictate a design and we cannot force an applicant to get a new architect.

Fast forward to June 13 at Planning Committee. This was the final vote of substance on the Chateau Laurier. It was the Site Plan application. Site Plan does not rise to Council. While several members of the public and the heritage community came out to speak against the expansion, Planning Committee passed the site plan by a vote of 8-3. I was one of the three to vote against the application. Important to note that up until after this final vote on the Chateau Laurier, the opposition from the general public and from members of Council was not vocal.

Everything from that point until today has been political theatre. Councillors, especially those who are beyond their first term, understand process. We understand policy. We know what our votes mean and we know what happens to files from that point forward. What we don’t always know is how the public will react. Needless to say, the reaction in recent weeks has been boisterous.  

In an effort to sway the public to believe we could actually stop the addition, the motion was introduced to “revoke” the heritage permit. The reality is that Council has no ability to revoke the permit so what the motion really attempted to do was set up road blocks forcing Larco to either challenge us in court or redesign. We already knew they were not interested in a sixth design. I confirmed this personally before I voted against the site plan application. Therefore, the motion to halt the expansion was misleading. These are the types of votes I consider to be built on political posturing. It is about telling the public what they want to hear knowing full well they will not get what they want. It is the “well, we tried” approach. I do not operate that way so I did not support the motion.

The court option is an interesting one and it is not dissimilar from the Minto Mahogany proposal from 2008. The City’s record of defending Council opposition to Council approved policy is poor. If you are the one being taken to court, you merely use our own policies against us and we have no supporting arguments. On the other hand, when the community takes the City and the applicant to court together, it actually has a higher likelihood of success. Therefore, I believe those opposed and willing to challenge are on better footing today than they would have been if the motion to “revoke” the permit had succeeded.

This issue is not over. We will continue to hear about it in the weeks and months ahead. As convoluted as the entire process has been, I hope I have been able to adequately explain how we got from September 2016 to today. I also hope that you can understand the reasons for my vote at the most recent Council meeting. It was NOT a vote for or against the design. I will leave it at that.

In two weeks, I will dive into the Solid Waste Master Plan review.

*****

If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Updates to the Green Bin Program & More Updates

The Scott Moffatt Golf 4 Youth Classic is in one week and it is not too late to register to play! Register today to help support the Youth of Manotick Association and the Richmond Youth Centre:   https://www.golf4youth.ca/ .

The Scott Moffatt Golf 4 Youth Classic is in one week and it is not too late to register to play! Register today to help support the Youth of Manotick Association and the Richmond Youth Centre: https://www.golf4youth.ca/.

In recent weeks, there have been a number of items that have come to Council that have been the subject of much debate and discussion, such as the Chateau Laurier addition, Climate Emergency and single-use plastics. Over the course of the summer, I will dedicate this column to shedding light on these issues and Council’s decision, specifically my position. Before that, though, Council made another decision last year, which will now come into effect. That decision was to expand the green bin program to permit the use of plastic bags.

Plastic bags will be allowed as a bagging option for organics in the green bin, such as food scraps, paper towel and tissue, and coffee grinds, beginning July 2nd. This is in addition to the current options of placing organics in paper bags in the green bin. Pet waste will also be accepted, including dog waste and kitty litter.

In a recent survey conducted by Hill & Knowlton commissioned by the City of Ottawa, sixty per cent of people who seldom use or do not use the green bin said they would participate if plastic bags were allowed. There are a number of reasons residents have stated why they do not use it but the primary one in our area has been about the messy nature of the bin. These changes will help address those concerns and make the green bin more convenient and easier to keep clean. In addition, using the green bin takes advantage of weekly pickup, while garbage going to landfill is collected bi-weekly.

The organic waste facility has been retrofitted to rip open the plastic bags and separate the organic waste for composting. The plastic bags are then disposed in the landfill. Getting more homes participating in the green bin program will divert more organic materials from the landfill and significantly extend its life.

If residents choose to use plastic bags to dispose of their organics, the City encourages them to reuse bags that may otherwise be thrown out, such as milk or bread bags. The plastic bag option is just one of many that are tailored to our residents’ comfort level and interest.  The other options include:

  • Paper bags to keep their green bin clean – including leaf and yard waste bags

  • Newspaper linings in the bin and kitchen containers

  • Cereal boxes and milk cartons to contain food waste

The City encourages residents who are using these options to continue their current practices. Residents can explore all options and learn what type of organic materials go into the green bin at ottawa.ca/greenbin.

For residents who have curbside collection but don’t have a green bin, go online to my.service.ottawa.ca or call 3-1-1 and one will be delivered to your front door. 

Borrowing Park Equipment from the City

As we approach the time of year when communities host special events and celebrations in parks, this is a reminder that additional park equipment like picnic tables, waste receptacles and recycling receptacles can be reserved through the City's Centralized Facility Allocations Unit by calling Kaitlyn Lester at 613-580-2424 ext. 41497 or at Kathleen.Lester@Ottawa.ca. Because stock is limited, and to avoid disappointment, organizers are encouraged to book at least seven days before an event.  
 
The available equipment is loaned out at no cost to event organizers. However, the City is not able to offer delivery of the equipment to event locations and therefore, user groups are responsible for making transportation arrangements to receive and return the equipment from City ward yards from Monday to Friday 8:30am to 2:30pm. As required, staff can provide organizers with a list of available commercial transportation services as a reference source at the time that reservations are made.

Nominations Open for 2019 Order of Ottawa

The Order of Ottawa recognizes the professional achievements and outstanding service of exceptional Ottawa residents. This prestigious civic award honours up to 15 of Ottawa’s most deserving individuals each year. Any resident of Ottawa who has made a significant contribution in a professional capacity that has been of benefit to our community may be nominated.

The Order of Ottawa is intended to recognize those who have made significant contributions through their professional endeavours, to life in the city in any of the following areas: arts and culture, business, philanthropy, health care, education, public service, labour, communications and media, science, sports and entertainment and other fields that benefit Ottawa.

The Brian Kilrea Award for Excellence in Coaching, which will be presented at the Order of Ottawa awards ceremony in the fall of 2019, recognizes the contribution of an amateur coach who best exemplifies the qualities of leadership and commitment that have been the hallmarks of Brian Kilrea’s career. Mr. Kilrea is a retired hockey head coach, general manager and player, and is best known for his 35-year association with the Ottawa 67’s. He is a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame, has played and coached in the NHL and, with more than 1,000 career victories, he is the most successful coach in Canadian junior hockey history.

Nominations for the Order of Ottawa or the Brian Kilrea Award for Excellence in Coaching may be completed online or by filling out a nomination form in pamphlets that are available at the City Hall Information Desk, and at your local community centre, public library, or at any client service centre. The deadline for nominations is Friday, September 13th at 11:59pm EST.

Previous Rideau-Goulbourn recipients include Drs. Rod & Lucy Rabb, Cyril Leeder and William Tupper. More information on both awards can be found online at ottawa.ca/orderofottawa. Nominations by immediate family members, self-nominations, and posthumous nominations will not be accepted. Elected municipal, provincial and federal officials are not eligible for this award while they are in office.

Farmers’ Markets

It’s time to enjoy our local Farmers’ Markets! The Manotick Farmers’ Market (in Dickinson Square) runs on Saturdays from 9 am until 3 pm. The North Gower Farmers’ Market (located at 2397 Roger Stevens Drive) runs on Saturdays from 8 am until 1 pm. Both markets will run until October 12th. Shop local and enjoy!

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Harold Brown Park, Order of Ottawa, Brian Kilrea Award & More

We hope everyone had a chance to enjoy Dickinson Days, an annual tradition which celebrates Manotick’s founder, Moss Kent Dickinson.

We hope everyone had a chance to enjoy Dickinson Days, an annual tradition which celebrates Manotick’s founder, Moss Kent Dickinson.

We hear many concerns about speeding in our communities. Most recently, a resident called our office and asked that we remind neighbours to share Second Line Road. In general, we ask residents to be cognizant of pedestrians and cyclists using our roads and to be mindful of the speed limit. Of course, this also applies to every other road as well.

Although we wish we had the means to eliminate speeding permanently, we have traffic calming measures that can help address this concern. First and foremost, we always like to stress the importance of reporting speeding and dangerous driving. You can report this to Ottawa Police Service at 613-236-1222 or online at www.ottawapolice.ca/onlinereporting. Reporting traffic infractions will assist police in deploying staff for enforcement in the area.

Another traffic calming measure we routinely utilize is deploying speed display boards, which raise awareness of excessive speeding. Boards are placed on a rotational basis to capture speed data, which is then used, by the City and Ottawa Police to address speeding concerns in our neighbourhoods. If you notice excessive speeding and believe a speed display board would be beneficial, please contact my office. Please note: the timeline for deployment does vary based on availability.

My office also has a limited amount of “Slow Down For Us” lawn signs. If you would like one for your lawn, please contact my office and we will do our best to get you one. 

We understand how dangerous speeding is and ask all residents to be cognizant and careful while driving in Rideau-Goulbourn and beyond. 

Harold Brown Park

In recognition of his historical significance to the community of Richmond, the City of Ottawa has received a proposal to name the future park at Shea Road and Kirkham Crescent, the Harold Brown Park. Harold Brown played an integral role in the history of the landmark Richmond Bakery, which operated in the community for more than seven decades. In 1930, Harold Brown went into business as a baker, initially operating on McBean Street, in Richmond.

The bakery had no electricity and produced 325 loaves per batch in a brick, wood-fired oven. Bread was delivered to the surrounding countryside using horses loaned by local farmers, across an area 32 kilometres from the bakery, in all directions.

Mr. Brown joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1939, and served as a sergeant until his discharge in 1945. He returned to Richmond to open a new bakeshop, which subsequently relocated to Perth Street, where it would remain until it closed in August 2014.

Rural Economic Development Strategy

I would like to extend an invitation to join the City of Ottawa on Wednesday, June 12th or Thursday, June 13th for a focus group designed to convene key rural stakeholders to help guide the City of Ottawa’s Rural Economic Development Strategy (REDS).

The focus groups are part of a comprehensive stakeholder engagement plan that is intended to support the development of a Rural Economic Development Strategy and Action Plan. The Strategy and Plan will outline the City’s strategy and approach to stimulate economic growth in rural Ottawa. The geographic focus of the strategy is targeted primarily at Wards 5 (West Carleton-March), 19 (Cumberland), 20 (Osgoode), and 21 (Rideau-Goulbourn).

The focus group sessions will be action oriented with an emphasis on priority setting. The goals of the sessions will be to:

  • Understand the perspectives, challenges, and expectations of rural businesses

  • Provide clarity to issues identified in the business and community surveys

  • Explore solutions or emerging opportunities to stimulate rural economic growth

As a key rural stakeholder, the City’s REDS will greatly benefit from your knowledge, experience, and views. Please visit engage.ottawa.ca/REDS for registration details and other ways to engage. Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Jephtée Elysée at 613-580-2424 x 21656 or jephtee.elysee@ottawa.ca.

Nominations Open for 2019 Order of Ottawa

The Order of Ottawa recognizes the professional achievements and outstanding service of exceptional Ottawa residents. This prestigious civic award honours up to 15 of Ottawa’s most deserving individuals each year. Any resident of Ottawa who has made a significant contribution in a professional capacity that has been of benefit to our community may be nominated.

The Order of Ottawa is intended to recognize those who have made significant contributions through their professional endeavours, to life in the city in any of the following areas: arts and culture, business, philanthropy, health care, education, public service, labour, communications and media, science, sports and entertainment and other fields that benefit Ottawa.

The Brian Kilrea Award for Excellence in Coaching, which will be presented at the Order of Ottawa awards ceremony in the fall of 2019, recognizes the contribution of an amateur coach who best exemplifies the qualities of leadership and commitment that have been the hallmarks of Brian Kilrea’s career. Mr. Kilrea is a retired hockey head coach, general manager and player, and is best known for his 35-year association with the Ottawa 67’s. He is a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame, has played and coached in the NHL and, with more than 1,000 career victories, he is the most successful coach in Canadian junior hockey history.

Nominations for the Order of Ottawa or the Brian Kilrea Award for Excellence in Coaching may be completed online or by filling out a nomination form in pamphlets that are available at the City Hall Information Desk, and at your local community centre, public library, or at any client service centre. The deadline for nominations is Friday, September 13th at 11:59pm EST.

Previous Rideau-Goulbourn recipients include Drs. Rod & Lucy Rabb, Cyril Leeder and William Tupper. More information on both awards can be found online at ottawa.ca/orderofottawa. Nominations by immediate family members, self-nominations, and posthumous nominations will not be accepted. Elected municipal, provincial and federal officials are not eligible for this award while they are in office.

 *****

If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Construction in Rideau-Goulbourn and Drop-In Sessions

Congratulations to Rideau-Goulbourn residents Sanchit and Riya Gupta on receiving the Mayor’s City Builder Award at Council on Wednesday, May 22. The Guptas established a chapter of MealCare, a non-profit organization that aims to combat food waste, in Ottawa. Working with local restaurants, university cafeterias and grocery stores, the Guptas take in surplus food, and, with the help of fellow volunteers, redirect it to shelters and soup kitchens where it is needed most.

Congratulations to Rideau-Goulbourn residents Sanchit and Riya Gupta on receiving the Mayor’s City Builder Award at Council on Wednesday, May 22. The Guptas established a chapter of MealCare, a non-profit organization that aims to combat food waste, in Ottawa. Working with local restaurants, university cafeterias and grocery stores, the Guptas take in surplus food, and, with the help of fellow volunteers, redirect it to shelters and soup kitchens where it is needed most.

In my most recent column, at the beginning of May, I highlighted the many culvert replacement projects that were scheduled to take place this summer. Many of these culvert renewals will lead directly into our roads program for 2020, such as Roger Stevens Drive and the other part of Rideau Valley Drive North. For now, though, I would like to focus on 2019 and let you know what you can expect to see under construction throughout Rideau-Goulbourn. Spoiler Alert: It is a lot.

We will begin with three major capital projects, two of which are ongoing. The McBean Street Bridge is still on schedule to re-open in December 2019. Construction will continue throughout the summer. The west side of the bridge is nearing completion following which the east side of the bridge will be dismantled, requiring another full closure of the bridge. We will continue to provide updates on this project. The Kanata South Link project continues as well with the widening of Old Richmond Road, between Hope Side Road and West Hunt Club as well as the construction of the roundabout at Hope Side Road. Finally, the intersection of Prince of Wales Drive and Bankfield Road will be under construction this summer as the City adds turning lanes in all directions. Additionally, Bankfield Road will be widened back to First Line Road and a signalized intersection will be installed at that point.

Onto road renewal, we have a number of Fall 2018 projects that were delayed due to the early winter that will get underway as soon as possible. Those include the McBean Street intersection with Goodstown Road, the Owlshead Road intersection with Munster Road, as well as portions of Dobson Lane, McCordick Road, and Third Line Road. These projects have already been awarded and will begin when half load restrictions are lifted from our roads. The list of 2019 road renewal projects in Rideau-Goulbourn include: 

  • Joy’s Road (Ottawa to Franktown)

  • Rideau Valley Drive North (Roger Stevens to Rideau Narrows)

  • Fallowfield Road (Eagleson to Huntley)

  • Barnsdale Road (Moodie to 416)

  • Barnsdale Road (Greenbank to Prince of Wales)

  • Hazeldean Road (Jinkinson to Carp)

  • McBean Street (Rail Crossing)

  • Dwyer Hill Road (Rail Crossing)

  • Manotick Main Street (Bankfield to Bridge)

  • Strachan (West of McBean)

  • Longfields Drive (Prince of Wales to Golflinks)

  • Carp Road (Hazeldean to Westbrook)

  • Mackey Road (Malakoff to Viola)

On our gravel roads, Paden Road will see its final lift in the two step rural road upgrade process between Harnett Road and Malakoff Road. Black’s Side Road will be upgraded using the same process this year and next between Ridingview Crescent and Flewellyn Road. McCordick Road, between Mackey Road and Cowell Road, will see new guiderails installed.

Some construction will also take place in a few of Rideau-Goulbourn’s many parks and also on a new one. Sarah McCarthy Park will see construction begin this month with a slated completion date of July. It will be Richmond’s newest park located on Cedarstone Drive. Keeping in Richmond, some final touches will be done on the work that took place in King’s Grant Park last year and the play structures at Richmond Lions Park will be replaced shortly. In Manotick, a collaborative effort between residents and my office has resulted in some new features being added to Gordon & Ivy Scharf Park. That work will also begin shortly.

Finally, in some less exciting but important nonetheless news, nearly $20M will be spent at our Trail Road waste facility which includes the replacement of the scale house and the capping of Stage 2 of the landfill. The landfill has a total of five stages. This is form part of a larger discussion in June as the Environment Committee begins discussing waste diversion and the Solid Waste Master Plan.

Drop-In Sessions

Our drop in sessions will be going on hiatus during the month of June due to the pending addition to my family but we will be back on schedule in July. I can imagine the stress this might cause you so, as always, feel free to contact my office anytime and we will do our best to assist. July will come before you know it and you can come visit at one of our next drop in sessions, with the first likely being held in Richmond.

*****

If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Storewater Fee Further Explained, Drop In to Chat,

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Our drop in sessions continue in May. After a great opportunity to spend the day in the new Morning Owl in Manotick on May 1st, we will move our next drop in session to Burritt’s Rapids on Wednesday, May 15th between 10:00am and 3:00pm at the Community Hall. We will not be scheduling any drop ins during the month of June due to the pending addition to my family but we will be back on schedule in July.

If there are any specific locations you would like us to hold one of these sessions, please let us know! We are open to suggestions. The only requirement is that we need Wi-Fi. 

Stormwater Fee Update

Approved in 2016, there remains plenty of misconceptions being shared about the City of Ottawa's stormwater fee so I would like to take this opportunity to provide some context. In 2019, $12 million will be spent on culvert replacements, repairs and construction in the rural area, funded by the stormwater fee. Specifically, $3.8 million will be used to design and construct 42 culverts in Rideau-Goulbourn. To put that $3.8M in perspective, the stormwater fee collected $1M last year across rural Ottawa. The money collected in rural Ottawa stays in rural Ottawa and then some. I have included a comprehensive list of culvert replacements planned for 2019 below. Culverts, wet ponds and dry ponds found in rural areas are key pieces to the stormwater system – in the prevention of flooding, mitigating erosion, as well as protecting water quality in rivers, creeks, and streams.

As a refresher, the intent of the new fee was to improve how the City bills for water, wastewater and stormwater to create a fairer and more sustainable system for its residents. It recognizes the different types of services received by those in serviced areas of the City and those who rely on private wells in urban and rural Ottawa. One of the key outcomes of the new rate structure was the implementation of a new charge for stormwater services for properties that did not pay this fee.

Stormwater will be charged through a fixed rate fee to all applicable properties that benefit from stormwater service. For connected properties, this fee was previously included in the sewer surcharge rate for connected properties. Therefore, if you have always received a water and/or sewer bill, you have always been paying for this and nothing changes significantly except for that other residents are now sharing the cost. Properties that do not receive a water utility bill see the stormwater fee on their property tax bill instead.

Historically, all properties were paying for stormwater either on their water bill or as a tax levy, or a combination of the two. In 2001, 100% of the fee was moved to the water utility bill as part of the sewer surcharge, meaning that only connected properties that received a water bill contributed to stormwater management funding. For those connected to the City water system, the fee was charged based on water consumption. However, stormwater services are not affected by how much water you consume and nearly everyone benefits from stormwater infrastructure, even those not connected to City water. 

The implementation of the new rate structure started in May 2017 when non-connected properties first saw a new stormwater charge on their final tax bills. It was planned that the stormwater charge would phased in over four years to allow non-connected property owners time to adjust. In 2017, owners paid 25% of the fee, they paid 50% in 2018, will pay 75% in 2019 and by 2020 non-connected properties will be paying 100% of the fee. As promised, here is the list of planned culvert replacements in Ridea-Goulbourn:  

2019 List of Culvert Projects in Rideau-Goulbourn

•         Barnsdale Rd Culvert
•         Bowrin Rd Culvert
•         Century Rd E Culvert
•         Donnelly Dr Culvert
•         Eagleson Rd Twin Culvert
•         Fallowfield Rd Culvert
•         Huntley Rd Culverts (2)
•         Kelly Marie Dr Culvert
•         Malakoff Rd Culverts (5)
•         Malakoff Rd Culvert
•         Mansfield Rd Culverts (3)
•         Mansfield Rd Culvert on Mansfield MD
•         McCordick Rd Culvert
•         Montague Boundary Rd Culverts (2)
•         Old Richmond Rd Culvert
•         Phelan Rd West Culvert
•         Pollock Rd Culverts (2)
•         Pollock Rd Culvert on Shouldice MD
•         Proven Line Rd Culvert
•         Purdy Rd Culverts (2)
•         Purdy Rd Twin Culverts (2)
•         Roger Stevens Dr Culverts (2)
•         Roger Stvens Dr Culvert
•         Second Line Rd S Culverts (2)
•         South Island Park Dr Culvert
•         Southwick Dr Culvert
•         Steeple Hill Cres Culvert
•         Third Line Rd S Culvert
•         Walgreen Rd West Culvert

Golf 4 Youth Classic

Join me on Friday, July 5 for the Scott Moffatt Golf 4 Youth Classic at the Canadian Golf & Country Club. It promises to be a fun day for the whole family with all proceeds going directly to the Youth of Manotick Association (YOMA) and the Richmond Youth Centre (RYC). I would love for you to participate!
 
We are also acquiring sponsorships and silent auction donations. If you are a local business and want to be involved in this event, please contact me and we’ll find an exciting way to get you involved.
 
For more details or to register, visit www.golf4youth.ca. I hope that we can make this a successful event that will benefit kids and families all across Rideau-Goulbourn.

 ***

If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Wild Parsnip, Rural Clean Water Program, Cleaning the Capital & More

With spring on the way, By-law & Regulatory Services (BLRS) would like to remind residents that not all small wild animals found alone without an adult are orphans. It is very common for mothers to leave their babies in the nest or den while they forage for food. In the majority of cases, these mothers will return to their young. If you find a baby wild mammal on its own (skunk, raccoon, rabbit, squirrel, etc.), please contact the Rideau Valley Wildlife Sanctuary first before calling 3-1-1.  Please do not attempt to move the animal from its den/nest or to feed it. If a resident has already touched the animal, please return it to where it was found. It is a myth that the mother will reject her babies if they have been touched. In addition, please note BLRS only responds to calls about    injured or sick small wild animals   .

With spring on the way, By-law & Regulatory Services (BLRS) would like to remind residents that not all small wild animals found alone without an adult are orphans. It is very common for mothers to leave their babies in the nest or den while they forage for food. In the majority of cases, these mothers will return to their young. If you find a baby wild mammal on its own (skunk, raccoon, rabbit, squirrel, etc.), please contact the Rideau Valley Wildlife Sanctuary first before calling 3-1-1.

Please do not attempt to move the animal from its den/nest or to feed it. If a resident has already touched the animal, please return it to where it was found. It is a myth that the mother will reject her babies if they have been touched. In addition, please note BLRS only responds to calls about
injured or sick small wild animals.

With Spring possibly upon us, I am hopeful that I will not have to cancel any of our rescheduled Town Hall meetings due to snow. As you already are aware, our Rideau-Goulbourn team has hosted a number of town hall meetings throughout the ward since the start of 2019. Unfortunately, due to the less popular Lionel Richie/Diana Ross collaboration, Endless Winter, we had to cancel a few meetings.

Our rescheduled Town Halls will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, April 15th from 7:00pm to 9:00pm at the Kars RA Centre (1604 Old Wellington Street)

  • Tuesday, April 23rd from 7:00pm to 9:00pm at St. Philip’s Parish Hall (127 Burke Street)

  • Saturday, May 4th from 10:00am to Noon at Christ Church (8948 Flewellyn Road)

  • Saturday, May 4th from 1:00pm to 3:00pm at Munster Community Centre (58 Dogwood Drive)

Drop in to Chat in Goulbourn

Our inaugural drop in session last week in North Gower was very successful. Our next "Drop in to Chat" session will be on Wednesday, April 17th at the Goulbourn Town Hall (2135 Huntley Road) from 10:00am to 3:00pm. We host "Drop in the Chat" sessions on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of every month at different locations across the ward. On these days, you are invited to stop by to chat about any concerns or issues that you have. Our following session will be on Wednesday, May 1st, tentatively scheduled for the new Morning Owl Café in Manotick.

If there is a specific location you would like us to hold one of these sessions, please let us know! We are open to suggestions. The only requirement is that we need Wi-Fi.

Wild parsnip management

Wild parsnip is an invasive plant that is increasingly common within the City of Ottawa in areas of uncultivated land, roadside ditches, nature trails, as well as on and surrounding rural and residential properties. Wild parsnip may pose a health risk to humans. The plant sap contains chemicals that may cause skin and eye irritation and make the skin prone to burning and blistering when exposed to the sun.

While the Public Works and Environmental Services Department has been proactively mapping out and controlling wild parsnip growth on public property, By-law & Regulatory Services would like to remind residents that they are responsible for removing invasive weeds on their private properties.

In accordance with the Property Maintenance By-law, the owner or occupant of a residential property must clear the lands of heavy undergrowth, long grass and/or weeds so that it is consistent with the surrounding environment.

Section 3(4) of the By-law also requires yards be clean and free from objects or conditions that may create a health or accident hazard. If a property owner fails to comply with an order to remove wild parsnip, the City is able to contract out the work at the expense of the property owner. In addition, the Ontario Weeds Act requires residents to destroy any noxious weeds, including wild parsnip growing on their properties.

We appreciate residents' help in managing wild parsnip! 

Apply Now for Grants through the Ottawa Rural Clean Water Program

The Ottawa Rural Clean Water Program (ORCWP) provides funding to landowners and non-profit organizations for projects that protect surface water and groundwater quality. Grants of up to $15,000 are available for 18 kinds of projects related to nutrient management, soil protection, water management, land stewardship, and education and innovation.

The next application deadline is May 1, 2019.

Farmers from rural and urban Ottawa along with landowners within rural Ottawa are eligible to apply. Approved applicants must complete a 3rd or 4th Edition Environmental Farm Plan (farm projects), or Healthy Home Guidebook (non-farm projects). Canadian Organic Certification is also accepted for some farm projects. Non-profit organizations can apply for education and innovation projects.

Applications will be accepted through the LandOwner Resource Centre, which works in partnership with the Mississippi Valley, Rideau Valley, and South Nation Conservation Authorities and the City of Ottawa. 

Contact the LandOwner Resource Centre at 613-692-3571 or toll free at 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1136. Visit www.ottawa.ca/cleanwater to see a full list of eligible projects and to download an application form.

Cleaning the Capital Spring Campaign

After the winter snow, frigid temperatures and ice, you can now turn your attention to the City of Ottawa’s 2019 GLAD Cleaning the Capital campaign, taking place from April 15 to May 15.
 
Registering is quick and easy:

Visit ottawa.ca/clean or call 3-1-1 (TTY: 613-580-2401) to register your cleanup. Our interactive map will show you which locations have already been claimed, and our online registration form will allow you to choose your own project site and indicate the cleanup supplies that you need. Select a location, such as a park, ravine, shoreline, bus stop or pathway – any public area that requires litter pickup or graffiti removal.

Thank you to everyone who has participated in the past and helped Rideau-Goulbourn win the Cleaning the Capital "Ward Award" for the greatest participation based on project participants per capita two years in a row!

Community Dancing in Manotick

Join the Ever Hopeful Stringband and caller Pippa Hall for a family-friendly, alcohol-free evening of community dancing, including circles, squares and contras on Friday, April 26th, from 7:00pm to 9:30pm, at the Manotick United Church. Each dance is taught and the whole family is invited. The evening begins with simple dances, followed by dances that build on skills as the evening progresses.  Admission for adults is $10, $5 for those aged 12-18 while kids under 12 are free. There is a family maximum admission of $20. For more information, call 613-692-4576 or visit http://dance.manotick.net.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

LRT Stage 2, Potholes, Drop in to Chat with Us and More

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At Ottawa City Hall on March 6th, City Council approved the next phase of the long term light rail plans, known as LRT Stage 2. In recent weeks, there has been much press on this project and not all of it has been accurate. Seeing as I supported moving forward with Stage 2, I just wanted to use this opportunity to speak to the project and address some recent misconceptions.

To begin, I think it is important to highlight the timeline for Stage 2. This is not something that has been rushed into. During my first six years on Council, we have approved various milestones leading toward extending the initial phase of LRT, which itself began during the 2006-2010 term of Council. In March 2017, Council approved the procurement process for awarding Stage 2 of LRT. At that time, we set the March 29th, 2019 date for signing the contract. Therefore, this current contract award process has been going on for the last two years. All bids had to meet certain criteria to get shortlisted and then the successful bidder was chosen from the short list. You have likely heard accusations of rushing the process. As you can see, that is not the case. Staff have just been following the Council approved schedule.

In terms of the timing of approving Stage 2 before Stage 1 is open and running. Based on the timeline above, it was never suggested by staff or committed to by Council that one was contingent on the other. The reality is that Stage 1 is close to the finish line and the Rideau Transit Group is under contract to deliver the project. Failure is not an option. Handing over an incomplete project is not an option. It is essential they get this right and we have made that clear to them. In fact, we haven’t even paid them since February 2018. They are only paid when they reach certain milestones. Rideau Transit Group also has the 30-year maintenance contract for LRT so this isn’t a group that is going to wrap it up and walk away. It is in their best interest to complete the contract as approved and ensure it operates how we expect it to.

Since Council agreed to a contract date of March 29, 2019, it is not just a simple task to delay a decision to wait for Stage 1 to be operational. We know the system will open. Stage 1 makes no sense without Stage 2. If we delayed beyond this month, we run the risk of contravening Council’s own procurement process. Even a six month delay would equate to an inflated construction cost of $100M. Starting over on the procurement process would result in a 1-2 year delay.

Finally, media reports have suggested that LRT does not work in the winter. This is simply not true. RTG has been running trains along the entire 12km track all winter. There were certain times where weather has impacted the testing but this has been during times that would not be replicated during normal operations. Normal operations on the track will help keep snow clear from the line. Additionally, RTG is sourcing snow melting equipment for the line that could be used overnight while the trains are not running. The one benefit of the delayed open date is that it has afforded RTG more time for winter testing during the worst winter in recent memory.

With the new contract, we also integrate lessons learned from the previous contract. One such change will be the Liquidated Damages aspect. In Stage 1, when RTG missed their in service deadline, they were had to pay $1M in liquidated damages. On a $2.1B project, I am not certain that $1M is a significant amount. As a result, the Stage 2 contract will feature a $10M cost assessed should the contractor not meet the handover date as set out in the contract.

In the end, I believe that moving forward with Stage 2 is the right thing to do. During the 2006 election, the sentiment was clear that the public wanted something different from the North-South O-Train proposal. Larry O’Brien was elected and the current plan was born. Over the last eight years, it has been our job to deliver and we have done that so far. The longer we defer the more money this project will cost. LRT Stage 2 will bring rail closer to Manotick in Riverside South and will drastically improve the commute for those on the 283 with a transfer at Bayshore. The main issues with the 283 in recent years have all taken place along the transitway in the urban core.

If anyone has any questions on this project, please do not hesitate to reach out to me.

2019 Town Hall Series

Over the last two months, our Rideau-Goulbourn team has hosted a number of town hall meetings throughout the ward. Unfortunately, as mentioned earlier, this has not been an ideal winter. As a result, we had to cancel a few meetings. While we are still working on rescheduling all of those meetings, we have rescheduled our Richmond Town Hall, which was postponed due to the Richmond Village Association Annual General Meeting. Our town hall meeting in Richmond will be held on Tuesday, April 23rd at 7:00pm at St. Philip’s Parish Hall. Tentatively, we are looking at Monday, April 15th for our Kars Town Hall. Stay tuned for dates for our town halls in Goulbourn, Ashton and Munster.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

City Budget, Kanata South Link & More

We may be ready for spring but at least winter is beautiful! This is a church in Burritt's Rapids captured before our Town Hall in January.

On Wednesday, March 6th, City Council will vote on the 2019 Budget. Since the beginning of February, the various boards and committees have discussed and voted on their relevant sections of the budget. That all culminates in the full Council discussion next week.

What is being proposed in this year’s budget is a 3% property tax increase. The primary purpose of the higher increase, over the last eight years, is infrastructure renewal. In 2017, Council approved a ten-year plan to eliminate the infrastructure renewal spending gap, which was $70M. However, given the prominence of renewal during the most recent election, Council is now looking to close that gap within five years. The projected 3% increase gets us there.

What does closing that gap mean for Rideau-Goulbourn? In recent years, we have seen annual renewal spending rise from approximately $50M annually in 2010 to $125M annually in 2017. This has led to many roads throughout the ward being resurfaced. With a projected annual spend of $195M by 2023, expect more of the same. Scheduled in 2019 are portions of Fallowfield Road, Rideau Valley Drive North, Barnsdale Road, Joy’s Road, Hope Side Road and Strachan. Mackey Road, between Malakoff Road and Viola Street will also be improved and the hard surfacing of Paden Road will be finalized.

Other local infrastructure projects include preliminary design work on the renewal of the Church Street bridge in North Gower, a new sidewalk connection on Nixon Farm Drive between Cedarstone and Perth Street and the previously mentioned upgrades to the intersection of Bankfield Road and Prince of Wales Drive. From a Parks & Facilities standpoint, improvements are scheduled for the North Gower Fire Hall, Dickinson House, Richmond Arena and Chris’s Field in Manotick. We will also be upgrading Gordon & Ivy Scharf Park in the Manotick Estates this spring.

On the stormwater infrastructure side of things, the City is projecting to spend nearly $13M on culvert replacements throughout the rural area. This is a significant increase over recent years and it all plays into the road renewal efforts as well. For instance, many culverts were replaced under Rideau Valley Drive North last year and that portion will be resurfaced this year. Two different budgets but all working toward the same end result. This is where your stormwater fee goes. All told, because of the way we structured the new fee, every dollar you pay for stormwater equals $12 spent on infrastructure in rural Ottawa. What that means simply is that your money is staying in rural areas and then some.

While there is plenty more in the $3.6B budget, I only have so much room in this column. More information is available at Ottawa.ca/budget and you can always email me if you have any budget related questions.

Kanata South Link

Approved in previous budgets, the Kanata South Link (KSL) construction started on Tuesday, February 19th. The main objective of the project is to improve safety and traffic flow based on growing demands in the area. The Contractor, Cavanagh Construction Ltd., will be performing the construction work for the City of Ottawa. The purpose is to widen Old Richmond Road and a portion of West Hunt Club Road to improve traffic capacity across the Greenbelt from Kanata South. The project includes:

  • the widening of Old Richmond Road from Hope Side Road to West Hunt Club Road, and West Hunt Club Road from Old Richmond Road to approximately 200 metres east of Moodie Drive

  • roundabouts at three intersections along Old Richmond Road: at Hope Side Road; at Stonehaven Drive; and at West Hunt Club Road

  • Intersection improvements at West Hunt Club Road and Moodie Drive

  • Asphalt resurfacing of Hope Side Road

  • Utility upgrades including street lighting

It is anticipated that construction will be completed by late 2020. For more information, visit: ottawa.ca.

Municipal Parking Management Strategy Refresh

The City of Ottawa is reviewing core aspects of its Parking Management Strategy. Provide your input on the City’s paid parking program at one of three upcoming open houses and help ensure the program meets the city’s needs. For more information, visit: ottawa.ca/parkingrefresh.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

LED Street Lights, City of Ottawa Winter Maintenance, New Ottawa Library & More

Thank you to all residents who have come out to our Town Halls thus far!  We've had great discussions and are excited about the work we have to do.   Photo credit:   Jeff Morris from the Manotick Messenger

Thank you to all residents who have come out to our Town Halls thus far! We've had great discussions and are excited about the work we have to do. Photo credit: Jeff Morris from the Manotick Messenger

Due to some unpredictable weather recently, I have had to postpone two of our previously scheduled town hall meetings. The two were planned for Munster and Ashton. Additionally, the Richmond Village Association scheduled their Annual General Meeting on the same evening as we have scheduled a town hall meeting in Richmond. As a result, we will be rescheduling that town hall as well as the ones in Munster and Ashton. We will be looking to April to hold those three meetings. We do, however, have two upcoming meetings on the following dates:

  • February 26th: Marlborough Community Hall, 7:00pm

  • March 5th: Goulbourn Town Hall, 7:00pm

LED Street Lights in Rideau-Goulbourn

At my North Gower Town Hall, we had a discussion about LED lighting and a resident wanted to know how many LED street lights were installed in Rideau-Goulbourn. We have a total of 1880 streetlights in Rideau-Goulbourn. Currently, we have 193 Hydro Ottawa Retrofit lights and 215 LED lights. There are still 1472 street lights that need to be changed to LED lights. Staff anticipate all of the lights being changed in 2020.

City of Ottawa Winter Maintenance

I know residents are frustrated by the amount of snow they have been forced to deal with this winter. City crews have been operating around the clock since January 19th and all resources have been deployed during snow events. The City is trying to clear and remove snow as quickly and efficiently as possible but with a record amount of snow in January, and February likely bringing a similar fate, it has been challenging. Please note that snow removal is based on a road-priority system, with high-use roads and emergency and transit routes cleared first. After the last snowflake falls, the city standard is that residential roads are cleared within 16 hours. If your street is missed, please call 311, as they are available to action your request 24/7.

The City also encourages residents to avoid parking on the street where possible, to support efficient snow removal. Please remember not to push snow onto the street as this puts others using the roadway at risk, and makes it more difficult for City plows to pass. We sincerely appreciate your help and your patience as the City continues to clean up the streets.

Ottawa Public Library and Library Archives Canada Joint Facility Project  

In December, Diamond Schmitt Architects and KWC Architects were selected to design the new central library, which will be an Ottawa Public Library and Library Archives Canada joint facility. Part of the design will include a robust public engagement process, both online and in person.

Billed as the Inspire555 series, in a nod to the facility’s new address at 555 Albert St., the engagement process will include design workshops, pop-up events, expert lectures, online activities (local and national) and engagement with Indigenous communities - all planned for 2019.

The first in-person design workshops on Building Blocks are set for later this month and the details are as follows:

Phase 1 Design Workshop: Building Blocks
Participants will be invited to register for one of two design workshops on how to make best use of the site for the new joint facility:

  • Thursday, February 28, 6 pm to 9 pm, Jean Piggott Hall, Ottawa City Halll

  • Saturday, March 2, 9 am to 12 pm, location to be determined

The public is invited to visit Inspire555.ca to pre-register for one of the two workshops.

From 2013 to 2016, more than 3,000 people provided input into the spaces and uses for a new central library. In 2016, following the decision to explore a partnership with Library and Archives Canada, the public provided input into the selection criteria for a site for the joint facility, as well as its functional programming.

This is an exciting time for our City and we encourage Rideau-Goulbourn residents to have their say!

Community Dancing in Manotick

Interested in a fun, interactive session of dance, laughter & music? Join the Ever Hopeful Stringband and caller Pippa Hall for a family-friendly, alcohol-free evening of community dancing, including circles, squares and contras. Each dance is taught and the whole family is invited. The evening begins with simple dances, followed by dances that build on skills as the evening progresses. The fun takes place Friday, February 22nd, from 7:00pm to 9:30pm, at the Manotick United Church.  Admission is $10, $5 for those aged 12-18 and free for anyone under the age of 12. The family max admission is $20. For more information, please call 613-692-4576 or visit http://dance.manotick.net.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Budget Consultation, Chris Bracken Park & More

On Tuesday, January 29 we hosted a Commemorative Naming Ceremony for the Mike O'Neil Arena (within the Manotick Community Centre). Thank you to "Manotick Mike" for your hard work and dedication to our community.

On Tuesday, January 29 we hosted a Commemorative Naming Ceremony for the Mike O'Neil Arena (within the Manotick Community Centre). Thank you to "Manotick Mike" for your hard work and dedication to our community.

I hope everyone is staying warm, dry, cold or which ever seems appropriate with this all over the map winter. As we move into February, we also get into budget season. While Council normally approves the budget in November, these things get pushed back in an election year. As a result, the budget will be tabled on February 6th. Following the tabling, Councillor George Darouze and I will be hosting a budget consultation meeting on Tuesday, February 12th at 6:00pm at the Osgoode Community Centre. City Finance staff will also be in attendance. If you wish to make comments directly to the City regarding the budget, you can email budget@ottawa.ca.

2019 Town Hall Series

Our town hall meetings are continuing throughout February and into March. Unfortunately, due to weather, we had to postpone our Munster meeting but we will reschedule that as soon as possible. As mentioned previously, the intent of these meetings is to look at what issues are present currently in our communities, what priorities we want to focus on and any other matters that residents feel requires our attention. It is also an opportunity to discuss how best we can improve communication. Each meeting is tailored to the host community. The following meetings are still upcoming.

  • February 4th: St. Benedict Elementary School, 7:00pm

  • February 6th: Ashton Christ Church, 7:00pm (TO BE RESCHEDULED)

  • February 13th: Kars Recreation Centre, 7:00pm

  • February 19th: St. Philip’s Parish Hall, 7:00pm (TO BE RESCHEDULED)

  • February 26th: Marlborough Community Hall, 7:00pm

  • March 5th: Goulbourn Town Hall, 7:00pm

I do want to take a moment to thank those who have come out to our town hall meetings thus far in Country Club Village, Fallowfield Village, Burritt’s Rapids and Manotick. Our North Gower Town Hall is on January 28th. We have had great discussions thus far and we do have some items to work on at the office following these successful meetings.

A Friendly Voice 

Recently, Rural Ottawa South Support Services launched A Friendly Voice; a 24 hour friendly visiting phone line for seniors. A Friendly Voice is possible thanks to a three year Provincial Impact Grant from Ontario Trillium Foundation.

Social isolation and loneliness can lead to serious health concerns, especially as we get older. Sometimes a simple conversation with another person can make a world of difference.  We invite you to share the phone number with others.

The phone line is primarily answered by trained volunteers. If you are interested in becoming part of A Friendly Voice, contact ROSSS at: 613-692-4697 or at info@ross.ca.

Playground Replacement Project

As local residents are aware, the play structure at Chris Bracken Park was vandalized a couple of years ago. Unfortunately, the City is self-insured so the replacement of the structure must come from the regular budget allocation. Having said that, the City is consulting on two options for the replacement of the play equipment proposed for Chris Bracken Park located at 5545 South River Drive in Rideau-Goulbourn Ward 21. The community is invited to provide comments and preference between the two options. Please visit my website for more information.

If you wish to provide comments please send, no later than February 15, 2019 to the Park Planner associated with this file, Renee Proteau. Ms. Proteau can be reached at 613-580-2424 ext. 26967 or
Renee.Proteau@ottawa.ca.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Happy New Year!

We hope you have had the chance to take in the beautiful lights in Richmond's Memorial Park!

We hope you have had the chance to take in the beautiful lights in Richmond's Memorial Park!

Happy New Year Rideau-Goulbourn! As we embark on a new year, I do so with new responsibilities at City Hall. In December, Council approved the roles and responsibilities for the new term of council. After serving last term as Chair of the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, I had the privilege of being named the Chair of the Environment Committee. Subsequently, I brought forward a Notice of Motion to change the name of that committee to the Standing Committee on Water, Waste and Environmental Protection. The intent is to ensure that the name of the committee reflects the broad mandate of the committee and its key priorities.

As for other responsibilities, I will continue to sit on Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee, Finance & Economic Development Committee and the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority. I will also be joining the Ottawa Community Housing Board and the Planning Committee.

2019 Town Hall Series

In the coming weeks, our office will be hosting a series of town hall meetings to help kick off the term of Council. We will host these meetings in Burritt’s Rapids, Pierce’s Corners, Kars, North Gower, Stittsville, Richmond, Munster, Ashton, Manotick, Country Club Village, Fallowfield Village and in the Quinn’s Pointe community in Barrhaven. These meetings will take place between January 9th and March 5th.

The intent of these meetings will be to look at what issues are present currently in our communities, what priorities we want to focus on and any other matters that residents feel requires our attention. It is also an opportunity to discuss how best we can improve communication. We have a number of new initiatives we are going to bring forward in order to better serve our residents. Included in that will be drop in meetings where residents can stop by and visit with our team. We will rotate these meetings around the ward every two weeks.

For the Town Hall meetings, we have the following meetings scheduled:

  • January 9th: Canadian Golf & Country Club, 7:00pm

  • January 12th: St. Patrick’s Church, 10:00am

  • January 15th: Manotick Arena, 7:00pm

  • January 19th: Burritt’s Rapids Community Hall, 10:00am

  • January 23rd: Munster Community Centre, 7:00pm

  • January 28th: North Gower Client Service Centre, 7:00pm

  • February 4th: St. Benedict Elementary School, 7:00pm

  • February 6th: Ashton Christ Church, 7:00pm

  • February 13th: Kars Recreation Centre, 7:00pm

  • February 19th: St. Philip’s Parish Hall, 7:00pm

  • February 26th: Marlborough Community Hall, 7:00pm

  • March 5th: Goulbourn Town Hall, 7:00pm

I very much look forward to these meetings, as does our team. I hope you will be able to attend.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

Merry Christmas and Final News of 2018

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On December 3rd, I had the great privilege of being sworn in as the Councillor for Rideau-Goulbourn for the third time. In the weeks since, we have gotten to work on the business of setting out the governance for this term of Council. This week, we confirmed Committee memberships and appointed Chairs of the Committees. I am excited to be appointed to the Chair of the Environment Committee, to sit on the Planning Committee and Ottawa Community Housing Corporation and to continue my work on the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, Built Heritage Sub-Committee, Committee of Revision and the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority.

This week we also debated the matter of retail cannabis sales at a special Council meeting held on Thursday, December 13th. It was decided that Ottawa will permit retail cannabis stores beginning April 1, 2019. Permitting retail cannabis stores will help reduce the black market and provide consumers access to safer products in a highly regulated environment. The City will spend less resources shutting down illegal sellers, and receive additional funding from the Ontario Cannabis Legalization Implementation Fund to offset the costs related to the legalization of recreational cannabis. Cannabis retailers will also create economic and employment opportunities in the city, including spinoff benefits for other sectors.

The direction followed Council’s consideration of the Report on Ontario Cannabis Legislation, Cannabis Retail Stores and Response to Council Direction of August 29, 2018 and feedback from public delegations.

Council heard presentations from nine members of the public. This is in addition to 23,000 responses to an online survey conducted earlier this fall. The responses to the online survey and a random sample telephone survey generally supported permitted retail cannabis stores in Ottawa. Public input indicates that residents want stores with appropriate controls and protections to minimize the impacts on the community.

Staff will report on the impact of the legalization of recreational cannabis on City services in late 2019.

Furthermore, this report focused on cannabis retail stores, however, as new issues emerge, the City will consult with residents and provide additional reports and recommendations to Council as required.

Following the three Council meetings in early December, the Christmas break will be upon us. In the new year, the new Committees will begin their work with focus on developing the term of Council priorities and preparing the 2019 Budget.

2019 Town Hall Series

In my last e-newsletter, I announced that our office will be hosting a series of town hall meetings to help kick off the term of Council. We will host these meetings in Burritt’s Rapids, Pierce’s Corners, Kars, North Gower, Stittsville, Richmond, Munster, Ashton, Manotick, Country Club Village, Fallowfield Village and in the Quinn’s Pointe community in Barrhaven. These meetings will take place between January 9th and March 5th.

The intent of these meetings will be to look at what issues are present currently in our communities, what priorities we want to focus on and any other matters that residents feel requires our attention. It is also an opportunity to discuss how best we can improve communication. We have a number of new initiatives we are going to bring forward in order to better serve our residents. Included in that will be drop in meetings where residents can stop by and visit with our team. We will rotate these meetings around the ward every two weeks.

For the Town Hall meetings, we have the following meetings scheduled:

  •  January 9th: Canadian Golf & Country Club, 7:00pm

  • January 12th: St. Patrick’s Church, 10:00am

  • January 15th: Manotick Arena, 7:00pm

  • January 19th: Burritt’s Rapids Community Hall, 10:00am

  • January 23rd: Munster Community Centre, 7:00pm

  • January 28th: North Gower Client Service Centre, 7:00pm

  • February 4th: St. Benedict Elementary School, 7:00pm

  • February 6th: Ashton Christ Church, 7:00pm

  • February 13th: Kars Recreation Centre, 7:00pm

  • February 19th: St. Philip’s Parish Hall, 7:00pm

  • February 26th: Marlborough Community Hall, 7:00pm

  • March 5th: Goulbourn Town Hall, 7:00pm

I very much look forward to these meetings, as does our team. I hope you will be able to attend.

Mayor’s City Builder Award

The Mayor’s City Builder Award is a civic honour that recognizes an individual, group or organization that have - through their outstanding volunteerism or exemplary action - demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to making our city a better place today and for the future. Past recipients have been honoured for their life-long service, outstanding acts of kindness, inspiring charitable work, community building and other exemplary achievements.  This award is presented at the beginning of each Ottawa City Council meeting.

As a member of Council, I would like to invite you to nominate individuals, groups or organizations that have had a positive impact in our ward and in our community.  Our aim is to ensure a diverse representation of outstanding residents from all corners of our city.

Please contact my office for nomination forms.

North Gower Client Service Centre Holiday Hours

Recognizing the lower volumes of transactions that typically occur, the City of Ottawa is reducing hours or closing the North Gower Client Service Centre (CSC) on the following dates:

  • Thursday, December 20th: 8:30am to 12:00pm

  • Thursday, December 27th: Closed

  • Thursday, January 3rd: Closed

Regular business hours will resume on Thursday, January 10th. The North Gower CSC is located at 2155 Roger Stevens Drive and is open on Thursdays from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.

2019 Town Hall Series, Richmond Transit Meeting, Washka Park & More

Speeding Costs You Deerly_EN.jpg

As we march into December and toward Christmas, things begin to get a little busier in the community and at City Hall. Throughout Rideau-Goulbourn, our communities will begin to celebrate Santa Claus’ arrival with countless events. Christmas in the Gower kicks it all off this Friday, November 30th. On Saturday, December 1st, the Manotick Santa Claus parade begins at 1:00pm. The Richmond Santa Claus parade takes place a week later on the 8th beginning at St. Philip’s School at 5:30pm.

Meanwhile, at City Hall, the new term of Council begins on December 1st with the official swearing in ceremony being held at the Shaw Centre on Monday, December 3rd. We will follow that up with a couple of Council meetings and the Nominating Committee as we determine who will sit on what committee or board in the coming term of Council. It is also anticipated that Council will consider the next steps for the City of Ottawa following the legalization of cannabis and Ontario’s regulations surrounding retail sales of cannabis.

2019 Town Hall Series

In 2019, we will be hosting a series of town hall meetings to help kick off the term of Council. We will host these meetings in Burritt’s Rapids, Pierce’s Corners, Kars, North Gower, Stittsville, Richmond, Munster, Ashton, Manotick, Country Club Village, Fallowfield Village and in the Quinn’s Pointe community in Barrhaven. We are still finalizing all of the dates and will communicate those shortly.

Richmond Transit Meeting

Before we host a general town hall meeting in Richmond, we will be hosting a Richmond Transit Meeting to discuss issues with the 283, transition to light rail and future opportunities. The meeting will be on Monday, December 10 from 7 to 9 pm at St. Philip's Parish Hall (127 Burke Street). Attendees at the meeting will include John Manconi (General Manger of Transportation Services Department), Jocelyne Begin (Manager and Special Advisor to the General Manager), Pat Scrimgeour (Director of Transit Customer Systems & Planning) and Troy Charter (Director, Transit Operations).

We look forward to seeing many Richmond residents there and working towards a sustainable solution. 

Washka Park

Manotick’s newest park design is seeking your input. Washka Park will be located at 855 Artemis Circle within the new Regional development, Riverwalk, on Manotick Main Street at Century Road. Comments are being accepted until December 14th. Please visit https://tinyurl.com/washkapark to find out more about Washka Park and to see the proposed design.

The name of the park is derived from an Algonquin word. Through the development process, archeologists found sherds of decorated Middle Woodland Period (approximately 500BC) pottery near the water within the development.  The Algonquins were contacted and they chose to name the archeological site with the word ‘washkà’ [wush-KAH], which is their word for ‘crooked’, and in this case acknowledges the zigzag lines impressed in the pottery sherds that were recovered.  As a result, Regional adopted that name for their proposed park.

Kanata South Link

In the past, I have mentioned the Kanata South Link project that will see the widening of Old Richmond Road and West Hunt Club as well as intersection upgrades including a roundabout at Hope Side Road and Old Richmond Road. I am pleased to report that the project is out to tender now and expected to close before year-end.  Utility work is scheduled to continue over the winter months.  Once the contract has been awarded, the priority will be to begin with layout, environmental mitigation measures such as erosion and sediment control, fencing, tree clearing for the utility works along the new road widening corridor and in-water works. 

The National Capital Commission Land Transfer Agreements were approved by the NCC Board last week. They will go through their internal processes over the next few weeks with final signature from the Director of NCC before they will finalize permission to enter the lands for construction.

Once half loads have been lifted in May 2019, the main construction work will begin and will be completed by fall 2020.  We will be sure to continue to post updates on this major project as it continues to progress.

A December Fa La La

The Village Voices Women’s Choir presents “A December Fa La La” on Sunday, December 9th at 2:00pm with special guests The Manotick Brass Ensemble at St. Paul’s Anglican Church, 5462 Osgoode Main Street.  Advance tickets are available for $12 while they can be purchased at the door for $15.  Children under the age of 12 free. There will be refreshments available and gift baskets to be raffled. The evening will also be an opportunity to collect non-perishable donations for the Food Bank. Please consider a donation when attending. For additional information, please contact donnaboudreau9@gmail.com.

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.


ARAC Meets on Monday, Road Work, Santa Claus Parades and More!

Here's a cool video residents may enjoy of the deck and girder removal of the McBean Street Bridge taken in August, during the full bridge closure. Click image to watch.

In recent weeks, there has been a number of construction projects throughout Rideau-Goulbourn, including the resurfacing of Rideau Valley Drive South and South Island Park Drive. Many culverts have been replaced over the same time. Unfortunately, there are certain projects that were scheduled that have been delayed. Planned road resurfacing work at the following locations will be deferred to 2019 since forecasted weather is not favorable to pavement work:

  • Intersection of McBean Street and Goodstown Road

  • Intersection of Owlshead Road and Munster Road

  • Third Line Road from 40m south of Prince of Wales Drive to 55m south of Prince of Wales Drive

  • Third Line Road from 30m south of Stratton Drive to 60m south of Stratton Drive

  • Dobson Lane from 55m west of McCordick Road to McCordick Road

  • McCordick Road from Mackey Road to 135m north of Mackey Road

  • McCordick Road from 215 north of Lockhead Road to 245m north of Lockhead Road (south bound lane only)

  • McCordick Road from Lockhead Road to 230m south of Lockhead Road

Work needs to be completed under temperatures that allow for proper compaction of materials and/or paving work. The forecasted weather will not allow us to achieve the desire product quality for our roads.

The contract is not cancelled and funding remains in place. The Contractor also remains engaged to complete the work. Work will resume in the spring of 2019, which is typically once asphalt plants re-open and when half-load restrictions are lifted. In the meantime, the contractor will be back to remove the construction signage and cones. I will post an update on these projects in the spring.

Get Involved With Your City!

The City of Ottawa is currently recruiting for citizen members to serve on various Committees and Boards. These include membership on the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority, Built Heritage Sub-Committee, Transit Commission and many more. The City benefits greatly from the expertise and knowledge of its citizens in this capacity and in return, those who join gain insight and knowledge of how the City works.

To be eligible, you must be a resident of the City of Ottawa and must be 18 years of age or older in order to be eligible for appointment.  Participants may be eligible for re-imbursement of some out-of-pocket expenses. Employees of the City of Ottawa are not eligible for positions as citizen members on committees, conservation authorities, boards, sub-committee or commission.

For more information, please visit ottawa.ca/committees or contact Carole Legault at 613-580-2424, ext. 28934 or by email at committees@ottawa.ca

Free Well Water Testing

Ottawa Public Health recommends that residents on well water test their water supply three times a year (or after major plumbing work). You can test your water for free by dropping off samples at many locations across the City (visit www.ottawapublichealth.ca for locations).

The newest location for pickup of bottles or dropping off samples is at The General Store Marketplace in Ashton during regular business hours, which you can find on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/thegeneralstoremarketplace/. Residents can pick up bottles any day during regular business hours and can drop off samples every Thursday (the courier will pick up samples every Friday at 8 am). 

Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind Holiday Bake Sale

Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind will host its 9th annual Holiday Bake Sale on Saturday, December 1 from 9:00am until Noon. Stop by to purchase some homemade baked treats and other unique items.  Indulge on the day or stock up on baked goods to serve guests over the holidays. Other items include Christmas cards, TY Beanie Babies, doggy bone Christmas wreaths, dog toys, and exclusive Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind merchandise. 100% of the sales proceeds support Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind. 

Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind is located at 4120 Rideau Valley Drive North. For further information about the Holiday Bake Sale, please contact (613) 692-7777 or email events@guidedogs.ca.  Please note there will be no outside vendors at the event.

Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind was established as a registered charity in 1984.  Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind has provided more than 850 professionally trained guide dogs to Canadians who are visually impaired from coast to coast.  Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind also has an Assistance Dogs Division, which trains assistance dogs for individuals in the Ottawa area with mobility-related disabilities.

West Ottawa Ladies Chorus’ Christmas Concert

The West Ottawa Ladies chorus is delighted to present its annual Christmas concert, this year entitled Sing with Festive Cheer!  It will take place on Friday evening, December 7th at 7:00pm and again on Saturday afternoon, December 8th at 2:30pm.  The venue is St. Paul's Anglican Church in Kanata.

The 40-voice choir is directed by Robert Dueck and accompanied by well-known jazz pianist Peter Brown.  Guests this year will be oboist Robin Tropper and flautist Kathryn Adeney.  There will be a selection of beautiful carols and some sing-along numbers.  Tickets are $15 advance with retail outlets listed on the website and $20 at the door.  You can also buy online for $18 through the website at www.westottawaladieschorus.ca

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If you have any comments, questions or concerns, please feel free to email me at Scott.Moffatt@ottawa.ca or contact me by phone at 613-580-2491. For information on Rideau-Goulbourn issues, please visit RideauGoulbourn.ca.